Life at GÉANT​

​"So much more than IP networks"


What do you do at GÉANT?

I am part of the GÉANT Operations Centre (GOC), which is the first point of contact for the NRENs’ operation centres for all their network-related issues. GOC engineers sit at the heart of GÉANT operations and are responsible for keeping the data moving. In particular, one of our main tasks is incident management. On a daily basis we tend to deal with common issues related to media (fibre) or hardware faults, we answer customer queries and also deal with change management and routing network upgrades - both on optical and IP layer.  To ensure 24/7 support to NRENs, the GOC works in two shifts: morning and evening; whilst nights and weekends are covered by on-call first line support. 


Why GÉANT?

I joined GÉ​ANT in 2012, until then I had mainly worked in voice and transmission networks, so the move was driven by the desire to work for an IP network service provider, but over time I have realised that GÉANT offers so much more than IP networks.

 

It is amazing to be part of the GÉANT family, such an integral member of the wider research and education community which, with its own unique data and connectivity requirements, drives innovation and helps us learn and work on new technologies. Our network supports a great variety of interesting projects such as the LHC at CERN or Eumetsat, both quite fascinating. The incredible focus placed by GÉANT on learning and development of staff, facilitates career progression. The working environment is very supportive and friendly too. We are never idle, but expectations are realistic, making the work environment challenging and fun at the same time. In summary, the GOC is a brilliant place to work and this is proven by our team’s very low employee churn rate. 


About Temoor

Temoor has a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering and has worked in the telecommunication industry for the last 15 years. His area of expertise lies in transmission, but he is comfortable with IP networks as well. In his spare time he likes to play cricket. He is also trying to debunk the myth that eating too much chocolate can result in weight gain: he is his own guinea pig and the results so far have been unsuccessful. ​